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Cohorts

The core of IDA’s work lies in our community. Our community is our foundation, our starting place, and the measure of our success. Detroit-based facilitator, healer, and doula adrienne maree brown offers us the idea of emergent strategy, which is “how we intentionally change in ways that grow our capacity to embody the just and liberated worlds we long for.” Emergent strategy encourages us to act on the belief that our relationships with each other are “the deepest work.” We hope to put this emergent strategy into practice in our IDA community.

The IDA cohorts are one way we can make IDA not only a place to work, but a place to be, feel, resist, and transform as a community. In practice, the cohorts are small groups of people centralized around specific interests in the arts that manifest content according to their goals. The cohorts are also spaces for people to gather and share their presence, skills, art, learning, and journeys. Each cohort meets regularly throughout the quarter, the frequency depending on their respective needs. Artist visits and workshops are examples of programming that can come out of a cohort’s energy and communal vision.

Fellows facilitate the cohort community building and meetings, particularly in the beginning of the year. However, the goal is to build a decentralized group that is sustainable and leader-full, where the cohort's ability to achieve its goals rests equally on the leadership of each member. To this end, fellows help build out members’ capacities and growth as leaders.

Cohorts are flexible and meant to adapt into whatever structure the members need: they can be an incubator of raw ideas and energy, a safety net of support, a mobilizing force, a platform for radically vulnerable sharing, a space to practice visionary fiction, and more. Cohorts are open to everyone who shares IDA’s values and mission, regardless of prior experience.

Cohorts are also communities of support and learning, where we push each other to find our growing edge and fall back together to heal and restore. Thus they are grounded in core values of sustainability and reciprocity. We hope the IDA cohorts are part of a thriving ecosystem of interconnected artists, healers, and movement builders on and beyond Stanford’s campus.

 

Currently, IDA’s cohorts include:

Committee on Black Performing Arts (CBPA) (~2 hrs/weekly)

A creative community of emerging artists and practitioners whose work illuminates themes of Black lives globally. Members of this group will work closely with Artist-in-Residence Amara Tabor Smith on visionary projects for Black liberation.

Facilitators: Amara Tabor-Smith (amarats@stanford.edu), A-lan Holt (aholt@stanford.edu), Morgan-Me'Lyn Grant (mgrant22@stanford.edu), Maya Burke (mburke3@stanford.edu), Alina Tucker (alina45@stanford.edu)

 

Arts + Practice Cohort (~2 hrs/weekly)

An active group of performers and art makers dedicated to fostering radical creativity for themselves and their larger communities. Past IDA projects include our popular Making Mondays series, Artist Talks, and Performances.

Facilitators: Sojourner Ahebee (sahebee@stanford.edu), Talia Flores (taliaf@stanford.edu), Sadhana Senthilkumar (sadhana@stanford.edu), Ari Marcus (music subcohort, arim@stanford.edu), Maya Burke (music subcohort, mburke3@stanford.edu)

 

Arts + Education Project Cohort (~2-4 hrs/weekly)

A community of scholars and activists interested in hip-hop pedagogy and its use in community and educational settings. Members of this group will learn from hip-hop educators and support our ongoing Arts and Education Project in East Palo Alto and the 5th Element Global Symposium in November.

Facilitators: Jeff Chang (jeffc410@stanford.edu), Adorie Howard (adorie@stanford.edu), Casey Wong (cwong587@stanford.edu)

 

IDA Thesis Cohort (~2 hrs/weekly)

A group dedicated to juniors and seniors in CCSRE, AAAS, or related fields in the arts who are pursuing advanced creative honors theses or capstone projects around identity, diversity, and aesthetics.

Facilitators: Alina Tucker (alina45@stanford.edu), Yeji Jung (yj1@stanford.edu)