Academic Programs

Featured Courses

AAAS/CSRE 170A: Unlearning Racism, Redefining Identity: Culture workers and the frontlines of Change
 

The fabric of racism is inextricably woven and constructed into the founding principles of the United States. As such, the concept of liberation and equity cannot be realized unless we address how race and racism sustain our collective oppression. The first three weeks of this course will utilize the Undoing Racism training work of The People’s Institute For Survival and Beyond (PISAB) based in New Orleans. PISAB is a national and international collective of anti-racist, multicultural community organizers and educators dedicated to building an effective movement for social transformation. PISAB is recognized as one of the foremost anti-racism training and organizing institutions in the nation. Following the first three weeks of Undoing Racism training, we will have weekly guest artists and scholars whose social justice work and approach will help us to imagine and effectively work towards building a more equitable culture and society.

 

IDA Instructors: Holt, A. (PI) ; Smith, A. (PI)

Guest Instructors: TBA

Terms: Spr | Units: 1-3

Letter / Credit/NoCredit

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AFRICAAM 128: Roots Modern Experience - Mixed level (Dance 128) 

In this course students will be introduced to a series of Afro-contemporary dance warm ups and dance combinations that are drawn from a broad range of modern dance techniques, somatic practices and dance traditions of the African diaspora with a particular focus on Afro Brazilian, Afro Cuban and Haitian dance forms. Our study of these dance disciplines will inform the movement vocabulary, technical training, class discussions, and choreography we experience in this course. Students will learn more about the dances and rhythms for the Orishas of Brazil and Cuba, and the Loa of Haiti with an additional focus on other African diaspora dance forms such as, Cuban Haitian, Palo, Samba and Samba-Reggae. Dance combinations will consist of dynamic movement patterns that condition the body for strength, flexibility, endurance, musicality and coordination. Through this approach to our warm ups and class choreography, we will deepen our analysis and understanding of how African diaspora movement traditions are inherently embedded in many expressions of the broadly termed form known as contemporary dance.

Terms: Spring 2021 | UG Reqs: way_ce

IDA Instructor:  Amara Tabor-Smith

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CSRE 385: Race, Ethnicity, and Language: Pedagogical Possibilities (AFRICAAM 389C, EDUC 389C)

This seminar explores the intersections of language and race/racism/racialization in the public schooling experiences of students of color. We will briefly trace the historical emergence of the related fields of sociolinguistics and linguistic anthropology, explore how each of these scholarly traditions approaches the study of language, and identify key points of overlap and tension between the two fields before considering recent examples of inter-disciplinary scholarship on language and race in urban schools. Issues to be addressed include language variation and change, language and identity, bilingualism and multilingualism, language ideologies, and classroom discourse. We will pay particular attention to the implications of relevant literature for teaching and learning in urban classrooms.
Terms: Win | Units: 3-4
Instructors: Banks, A. (PI)
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ARTHIST 194: U.S. Latinx Art (CHILATST 195, CSRE 195)

This course surveys art made by Latinas/os/xs who have lived and worked in the United States since the 1700s, including Chicanos, Nuyoricans, and other Black, Brown, and Indigenous artists. While exploring the diversity of Latinx art, students will consider artists' relationships to identity, race, ethnicity, gender, and sexuality. Students will also study how artists have responded to and challenged discrimination, institutional exclusion, and national debates through their work. Attendance on the first day of class is a requirement for enrollment.

Terms: Win | Units: 5 |UG Reqs: WAY-A-II, WAY-ED

Instructor: Salseda, R (PI)

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DANCE 30S: Contemporary Choreography: Chocolate Heads On-Screen: Dance and Video Project

Cinematography plus choreography equals Screendance. Now, all dance is screendance. Think of your favorite youtube videos, tik toks, and all your favorite movie musicals. This is your chance to star in a Chocolate Heads film production. During Fall quarter, the Chocolate Heads Movement Band conducted a series of dance and film experiments at home, that culminated in a fantastic Zoom Dance called 'Traveling in Place'. We started in our own homespaces, came together virtually, and made magic. If you'd link to see what we did in the fall, visit the Chocolate Heads Youtube channel: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ykDVlai-c2s Our goal is to cultivate the talents of all dancers through teamwork to touch, move, and inspire the audience. We will be partnering with the Stanford Doc Film Program, featuring guest workshops on storytelling through motion and film. We'll ultimately come together as a dance & filmmaking posse to create a screendance with both live and virtual elements. Be one of the brilliant dancers and choreographers who are shaping dance, art and video, integrating different dance styles and cultures, to unite the world.

 

Instructor: Hayes, A. (PI)

Terms: Win | Units: 2

 

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CSRE 171/AFRICAAM 171: Peering into darkness: critical research practices in contemporary art & astrophysics

We were peering into this darkness, crisscrossed with voices, when the change took place: the only real, great change I've ever happened to witness, and compared to it the rest is nothing --Italo Calvinonn`Peering into darkness is an interdisciplinary undergraduate research seminar guest taught by IDA visiting artist Janani Balasubramanian & collaborator Afra Ashraf. Together, we will joyfully open up science as a space to interrogate social questions and personal subjectivity. Students will explore weekly research themes such as observing, ghosts, abolition, fragmentation, and fables through critical texts, guest lectures, and practices of astrophysics and artmaking. Prerequisites include curiosity and play.

 

Instructor: Holt, A. (PI)

Terms: Spr | Units: 4

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